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Full text of "Annual report of the public schools of Cleveland County for the year .."

Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofpuOOclev 



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B. T. Falls, Co. Supt. W. D. Lackey, Ch'rm'n. 





W. L. Plonk. 



W. W. Washburn. 



Annual Report 



Of the 



Public Schools 



Of 



Cleveland County 

For the year 

July 1st, 1905, to June 30th, 1906. 



1906. 

Aurora Publishing Company, 

Shelby, N. C. 



Board of Education. 

*?• JT" Ct" 

W. D. Lackey, Chairman, Fallston, N. C. 

W. W. Washburn, Depew, N. C. 

W. L. Plonk, King's Mountain, N. C. 

B. F. Falls, County Superintendent, Shelby, N. C. 




Report of County Superintendent. 

Jt* Jf' Jt' 

To THE Board of Education of Cleveland County: 

Gentlemen: — 

I wish to submit the following report of the 
work done in the public schools of Cleveland county dur- 
ing the year beginning July 1st, 1905, and ending June 
30th, 1906. 

Owing to the records kept previous to about 1900 I 
could not get the dates when the schools were established 
and the cost of the same. 

The report of money expended for school houses dur- 
ing the past three years appears in full and is accurate. 

The total cost of the buildings is in most cases 
estimated, as quite a number of the patrons did some 
work instead of subscribing money, and no record was 
kept of this. The present value, of course, is estimated 
from notes taken during visits to the schools. The needs 
of the districts are set forth here for your future con- 
sideration. 

A statistical report of each school is given first, and 
then a few remarks are made by way of explanation. 



(3)^ 

Township No. 1, District No. 1. 

^^^ 9^^ ^r^ 

Palmer School. 

Teacher— Mr. E. D. Hamrick, salary per month $29. 

Census— Boys 35; girls 28; total 63; total enrollment 
44; average attendance 22i; No. of families sending to 
school 17; No. of families not sending to school 3; No. of 
illiterates on census roll 0; No. of grades in school 7. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds $150. 

The house is seated with desks and has plenty of 
blackboard space. Otherwise it is in rather bad condition. 
It is poorly lighted and ventilated. Interest on the part 
of the patrons seems to be short of what it might be. 

Township No. 1, District No. 2. 

t^?* t^^ ^^^ 

I Holly Springs School, established 1904. 

Teachers— Mr. E. C. Greene and Miss Ever Greene, 
salaries per month $40 and $20. Eleven dollars of princi- 
pal's salary raised by private subscription. 

Census— Boys 46; girls 53; total 99; total enrollment 
74; average attendance 63; No. of families sending to 
school 27; No. of families not sending to school 3; No. of 
illiterates on census roll 2; No. of grades in school 7. 

Cost to the county of house furniture and grounds 
$290.67; total cost $400. Present value $500. 

This school has a new house fairly well equipped and 
built on the State's approved plan. Much interest has been 
manifested in this district and special tax has been agitated. 
A splendid school has been taught here for the past few 
years. 

No. of volumes in library 84. Pupils using library 60. 
Times books were taken out 349. Cost of library $30. 



Township No. 1, District No. 3. 

«^ Jr* t^ 

Wood School, established 1905. 

Teacher— Mr. B. M. Ellis, salary per month $29. 

Census— Boys 30; girls 35; total 65 r total enrollment 
40; average attendance 22. No. of families sending to 
school 14; No. of families not sending to school 5. No. of 
illiterates on census roll 0; No. of grades in school 6. 

Cost of house furniture and grounds to the county 
$167.32; total cost $250. Present value $425. 

House is large and commodious. It needs more and 
better blackboard space. New maple desks have been 
placed in the school this year, and interest seems to be on 
the increase. 

Township No. 2, District No. 4. 

t^ t^ tS^ 

Mount Pleasant School. 

Teacher— Mr. P. C. Smawley, salary per month $29. 

Census— Boys 34; girls 32; total QQ; total enrollment 
52; average attendance 30; No, of families sending to 
school 17; No. of families not sending to school 7; No. of 
illiterates on census roll 1; No. of grades in school 7. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds $250. 

House is equipped with desks and blackboards. The 
district is too small and might be consolidated with dis- 
trict No. 5. 

Township No. 2, District No. 5. 

*^ *s^ «^ 

Trinity School. 

Teachers-^ Mrs. Antonette Hamrick and Miss Gazzie 
Turner, salaries per month $29 and $20. 

Census— Boys 53; girls 49; total 100; total enrollment 



. (5) 

71; average attendance 45. No. of families sending to 
school 20. No. of families not sending to school 13. No. 
of illiterates in district 3. No. of grades in school 6. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds $300. 

Most of the families not in attendance here are send- 
ing to Mooresboro. 

Township No. 2, District No. 6. 

,^ ,^ ^ 

Boiling Springs School, established 1901. 

Teachers— Mr. F. B. Hamrick, Mr. Garland Greene 
and Miss Julia McSwain. 

Census— Boys 81; girls 74; total 155; total enrollment 
152; average attendance 96. No. of families sending to 
school 58. No. of families not sending to school 1. No. 
of illiterates on census roll 0. No. of grades in school 8. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to county 
$144.12. Total cost $300. Present value $600. 

No. of volumes in the library 95. Books read during 
session 20. Cost of library $50. Library established 1903. 

House was equipped this year with best quality of 
silica blackboards and seated with maple desks. The 
patrons in this district manifest a great deal of interest in 
the school and would patronize a subscription school liber- 
ally for 8 months in the year. 

Township No. 2, District No. 7. 

.^ .* .;* 

Flint Hill School. 

Teacher— Mr. Lauton Blanton, salary per month $29. 

Census— Boys 41; girls 40; total 81; total enrollment 
70; average attendance 36; No. of families sending to 
school 33; No. of families not sending to school 2; No. of 
illiterates on census roll 2; No. of grades in school 6. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds $100. 



(6) 

House is old and out of date, and is poor in every 
respect. Interest seems to be very good owing to condi- 
tions. Steps should be taken to build a house before the 
next session. 

C*>oc*>oc*>oc*>oo<*:> 

Township No. 2, District No. 8. 

t^* ^r^ ^r^ 

Sharon School, established 1903. 

Teachers— Miss Minnie M. Ware and Miss Margie H. 
Sisk, salaries per month $27 and $22. 

Census— Boys 52; girls 54; total 106; total enrollment 
80; average attendance 54; No. of families sending to 
school 20; No. of families not sending to school 0; No. of 
illiterates on census roll 0; No. of grades in school 8. 

This property belongs to the conference and has been 
leased by the County Board of Education. Cost $600. 

No. of volumes in library 103. Pupils using library 60. 
Cost of library $50. 



,\^' 



Township No. 2, District No. 9. 

\j ^ J- J' 

v^\ Shanghai School. 



¥.^^ 




Teachers— Messrs. W. E. and D. F. McSwain, salaries 
er month $29 and $20. 

Census— Boys 58, girls 48, total 106, total enrollment 
90, average attendance 52. No. of families sending to 
school 26. No. of families not sending to school 0. Illit- 
erates on census roll 0. Grades in school 8. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds $150. 

The building is rather poor, but is fairly well equipped. 
Interest is very good; but this district, as well as No. 8, is 
too small for two teachers and the two ought to be con- 
solidated and the patrons vote a special tax to establish a 
permanent high school. 



_ (7) ^ ___________ 

Township 3, District 10. 

J* ^ «/* 

Broad River School. 

Teacher— Miss Ollie Hoyle, salary per month $29. 

Census— Boys 29, girls 28, total 57, total enrollment 
57, average attendance 34. Families sending to school 22. 
Families not sending to school 0. Illiterates on census roll 
0. Grades in school 7. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds $100. 

House is old and rather small. Interest seems to be 
on the increase. 

Township 3, District 11. 

t«9*' t«^ t«^ 

McBrayer School. 

Teacher— Mr. J. A, Weaver, salary per month $29. 

Census— Boys 27, girls 37, totol 64, total enrollment 
55, average attendance 41. Families sending to school 16. 
Families not sending to school 4. Illiterates on census roll 
0. Grades in school 7. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds $125. 

This district is also too small. Reasonable consolida- 
tion would increase the advantages and quicken the inter- 
est on the part of the patrons. 

Township 3, District 12. 
^ ^ .^ 

Earl School, established 1906. 

Census— Boys 48, girls 45, total 93. Illiterates on 
census roll 0. 

Cost to the county of house furniture and grounds 
$300, total cost $800. Present value $800. 

The old school site was sold for $250 and a new and 
up-to-date house was built in accordance with State plans. 



. (8) 

The district now has one of the best built and equipped 
houses in the county. A petition has been offered for a 
special tax election. No school was run this year except a 
private school, funds being used to pay for house. 

Township 3, District 13. 

Randle School, established 1905. 

Teacher— Miss Sallie Osborne, salary per month $29. 

Census— Boys 38; girls 27; total 65; total enrollment 
67; average attendance 44. No. of families sending to 
school 19; No. of families not sending to school 3. No. of 
illiterates on census roll 0. No. of grades in school 6. 

Cost of house furniture and grounds to the county 
^66; total cost $400. Present value $400. 

An excellent school was run here this year and the 
interest on the part of the people is all that could be de- 
sired. 

Township 3, District 14. 

•^ »^ t^ 

Patterson Springs School. 

Teachers — Mr. S. R. Anthony, Mrs. Wm. Lowery and 
Miss Belva Hamrick, salaries per month $29, $25 and $25. 

Census— Boys 52; girls 51; total 128; total enrollment 
108; average attendance 93; No, of families sending to 
school 33; No. of families not sending to school 18; No. of 
illiterates on census roll 0; No. of grades in school 7. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds $400. 

This district has a primary school in connection with 
the district school which proves to be unsatisfactory. . A 
better school could be run by having all attend the same 
school. 




Double Shoals School, District 60. 




Belwood Institute, District 57, 



i^l 

Townships, District 15. 
^ .* .< 

Pleasant Hill School. 

Teacher— Miss Sallie Ware, salary per month $29. 

Census— Boys 44, girls 22; total G6y total enrollment 
39, average attendance 28. No. of families sending to 
school 16. No. of families not sending to school 0. No. 
of illiterates on census roll 0. No. of grades in school 7. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds $125. 

Township 3, District 16. 

t^ t^ t^ 

Ellis School. 

Teacher— Mr. J. C. Camp, salary per month $29. 

Census Boys 24, girls 26, total 50, total enrollent 41, 
average attendance 25. No. of families sending to school 
12. No. of families not sending to school 1. No. of illit- 
erates on census roll 0. No. of grades in school 5. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds 1150. 

This district might be consolidated with No. 15 to a 
good advantage. Neither of the houses are adequate and 
both are poorly equipped, and are situated within a mile 
and a half of each other. 

Township 4, District 17. 

Borders School. 

Teacher— Miss Georgia Sepoch, salary per month $29. 

Census— Boys 36; girls 26; total 62; total enrollment 
37; average attendance 26. No. of families sending to 
school 17; No. of families not sending to school 3. No. of 
illiterates on census roll 0. No. of grades in school 7. 

Cost of house furniture and grounds to the county 
$97.55; total cost $250. Present value $200. 

The house was rhoved this year to a place near the 
center of the district and seems to be more satisfactorv. 



^ (10) 

Township 4, District 18. 

t^^ ^2r^ ^^ 

3 B's School, established 1904. 

Teachers— Mr. S. L. Carter, Miss Beulah Herndon and 
Miss Maggie Lee Harry, salaries per month $29, 125, $18. 

Census— Boys 72; girls 71; total 143; total enrollment 
111; average attendance 73; No. of families sending to 
school 34; No. of families not sending to school 5; No. of 
illiterates on census roll 4; No. of grades in school 6. 

Cost to the county of house furniture and grounds 
$474. Total cost $575. Present value $650. 

This district has a primary school which had a very 
poor attendance this year. It is not patronized liberally 
enough to justify the Board to pay a teacher. The princi- 
pal building is large enough to accommodate the entire 
district. 

Township 4, District 19. 

«^ «^ uT* 

Ware School, established 1903. 

Teacher— Mr. D. B. Stroup, salary per month $29. 

Census— Boys 36; girls 25; total 61; total enrollment 
56; average attendance 34; No. of families sending to 
school 12; No. of families not sending to school 2; No. of 
illiterates on census roll 3; No. of grades in school 6. 

Cost to the county of house furniture and grounds 
$258. 23. Total cost $258. 23. Present value $275. 

The house is equipped for two teachers while the dis- 
trict is hardly large enough for one teacher. The house 
was enlarged last year. 



(11) 

Township 4-, District 20. 

•^^ <^^ t^^ 

Elbethel School. 

Teacher— Miss Ida Ware, salary per month $29. 

Census— Boys 43, girls 31, total 74, total enrollment 
47, average attendance 38. Families sending to school 18. 
Families not sending to school 2. Illiterates on census roll 
0. Grades in school 8. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds $256. 

Township 4, District 21. 

t^ t^ j^ 

Dixon School. 

Teacher— Mr. S. C. Ratterree, salary per month $35. 
$6 per month raised by private subscription. 

Census— Boys 35, girls 35, total 72. No. of illiterates 
on census roll 3. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds $150. 

This is the only place we failed to visit this year as 
the school closed before the term was more than half out 
on account of sickness. No report therefore has been 
made as the term will be finished during the summer. 

Township 4, District 22. 

«^ Jf' tlr' 

King's Mountain Graded School, established 1905. 

Teachers— S. W. Carmile, Superintendent, salaries per 
month $29 each. 

Census— Boys 237, girls 231, total 468. Illiterates on 
census roll 40. Grades in school 8. 

Present value of house and grounds $1200. 

The town needs a new building. The present one is 
old and does not afford any degree of convenience. The 
site is an excellent one. 



(12) 

Township 4-, District 23. 

^r' «<9* «^^ 

Patterson's Grove School. 

Teacher— Miss Florence Carson, salary per month $29. 

Census— Boys 49; girls 42; total 91; total enrollment 
46; average attendance 33; No. of families sending to 
school 18; No. of families not sending to school 2; No. of 
illiterates on census roll 0; No. of grades in school 7. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds $200. 

A library was established this year but the books 
came too late for use during the session. The interest 
was increased here this year. 

Township 4, District 24. 

t^ t^ t^ 

Grover School. 

Teachers— Mr. B. M. Weir and Miss Edith Hambright, 
salaries per month $29 each. 

Census— Boys 65, girls 55, total 110, total enrollment 
97, average attendance 77. No. of families sending to 
school 35. No. of families not sending to school 1. Illit- 
erates on census roll 0. Grades in school 7. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds $400. 

Special tax has been agitated here by some of the 
leading citizens. Factions among the patrons have proven 
unfortunate for the school this year. We hope to establish 
a permanent high school here later. 

Township 5, District 25. 

t^^ ^r^ ^2^ 

Oak Grove School, established 1904. 
Teachers — Mr. W. D. Putnam and Mrs. Ora C. Blan- 
ton, salaries per month $24 and $15. 

Census— Boys 42, girls 37, total 79, total enrollment 






.•>■> 4 




Ledford School, District 65. 











Casar High School, District 70. 



(13) 

77, average attendance 47. Families sending to school 29. 
Families not sending to school 3. Illiterates on census roll 
0. Grades in school 6. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to the county 
$405.03. Total cost $405.03. Present value $550. 

The house is built in accordance with State plans, is 
large, commodious and attractive. 

Township 5, District 26. 

^^^ t^^ ft^^ 

Beam School, established 1904. 

Teacher— Miss Georgia Lutz, salary per month $29. 

Census— Boys 36; girls 48; total 84; total enrollment 
71; average attendance 48. No. of families sending to 
school 24. No. of families not sending to school 6. No. 
of illiterates on census roll 4. No. of grades in school 6. 
. Cost of building furniture and grounds to county 
$256.45. Total cost $256.45. Present value $300. 

The house is not built in accordance with State plans 
and is entirely too small for the district. Interest here is 
not what it should be. 

Townships, District 27. 

<^* t^^ ^^ 

Dameron School, established 1904. 

Teacher— Miss Dona Cline, salary per month $25. 

Census— Boys 7; girls 14; total 21; total enrollment 
23; average attendance 20; No. of families sending to 
school 12; No. of families not sending to school 0; No. of 
illiterates on census roll 0; No. of grades in school 4. 

Cost to the county of house furniture and grounds 
$339.27. Total cost 1339.27. Present value $400. 

Large farms and the large per cent of negro popula- 
tion help to make the census very small in this district. 
Notwithstanding this fact the area of the district is too 



(14) 

small. The house is built in accordance with State plans. 
A special tax election was held here and resulted in a vote 
of seven for and seven against special tax. 

Township 5, District 28. 

^?* ^r^ 9^^ 

Plonk School. 

Teacher— Miss Cora Mauney, salary per month $29, 
and boarded by patrons. 

Census— Boys 23; girls 20; total 43; total enrollment 
37; average attendance 3D; No. of families sending to 
school 13; No. of families not sending to school 0; No. of 
illiterates on census roll 0; No. of grades in school 6. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds $200. 

Librarian failed to make a report. 

Township 5, District 29. 

.^ ^ ^ 

Lackery School. 

Teacher — Mr. V. Q. Stroup, salary per month $25. 

Census— Boys 30, girls 33, total 63, total enrollment 
47, average attendance 28. Families sending to school 19. 
Families not sending to school 6. Illiterates on census roll 
3. Grades in school 7. 

Cost to the county of house furniture and grounds 
$09. 15. Total cost $175.00 Present value $225. 

Township 5, District 30. 

^^ tZ^ tS^ 

^W' Waco School. 

1^1^ Teachers— Mr. J. W. Stroup and Miss Jennie Elliott, 
!&/ ^1 salaries per month $29 and $25. 

\0f^ Census— Boys 41, girls 43, total 84, total enrollment 

80, average attendance 75. No. of families sending to 






(15) 

school 30. No. of families not sending to school 0. Illit- 
erates on census roll 0. Grades in school 7. 

No. of volumes in the library 80. Times books were 
taken out by pupils 90. Cost of library $42. The district 
needs a supplementary library, as most of the books are 
adapted to high school use better than for the lower 
grades. A special tax election has been ordered, and in- 
terest seems to be on the increase. 

Township 5, District 31. 

St. Paul School. 

Teacher— Bertha Lattimore, salary per month $29. 

Census— Boys 43; girls 40; total 83; total enrollment 
58; average attendance 37; No. of families sending to 
school 20; No. of families not sending to school 7; No. of 
illiterates on census roll 8; No. of grades in school 6. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to county 
$18.16. Present value $100. The repairing was done last 
year. 

The house is small, poorly ventilated and lighted. 
Another site ought to be purchased and a new building 
erected. 

« Township 5, District 32. 

,^ J' ,^ 

Stubbs School, established 1903. "^"^"^ ^ 

Teacher— Mr. W. H. Moss. 

Census— Boys 43; girls 48; total 93; total enrollment 
57; average attendance 31. No. of families sending 4o 
school 18; No. of families not sending to school 7. No. of 
illiterates on census roll 0. No. of grades in school 6. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds S250. 

This district is composed largely of factory population. 
The interest might well be increased. 




(16) 

Township 6, District 33. 

Shelby Graded School, established 1892. 

Teachers —Prof . W. W. Davidson, Superintendent; J. 
Y. Irvin, Principal; Misses Loutie Lee, Selma Webb, Mad- 
eline Miller, Nancy Tiddy, Annie Smith. Linnie Davis and 
Ollie Hamrick. 

Census— Boys 300, girls 337, total enrollment 245, 
average attendance 267. No. of illiterates on census roll 
3. No. of grades in school 10. • 

The building was burned in Octobar 1905. Work has 
already begun on the new one which the trustees hope to 
have ready for occupancy by October ls^ 

Township 6, District 34. 

A Rock Cut School, established 1904. 
^ Teacher— Miss Sudie Roberts, salary per month $25. 
V Census— Boys 28, girls '32; total 60, total enrollment 
oi^ 37, average attendance 29. No. of families sending to 

t\ school 13. No. of families not sending to school 3. No. 
of illiterates on census roll 5. No. of grades in school 6. 
jP ^ J Cost of building furniture and grounds to the county 

^ ^ $94.80. Total cost $175. Present value $250. 
'^^of The house is equipped for two teachers. The district 

joins district No. 32 in No. 5 township and is sufficiently 
large enough to accommodate the children of both districts 
and would be in easy reach of all the patrons. 

Township 6, District 35. 

«5* *s^ *s^ 

Ross Grove School, established 1904. 

Teachers— Mr. Geo. P. Webb and Miss Bessie Spang- 
ler, salaries per month $35 and $10. $6 of the principal's 
salary was paid by the private subscriptions. 



4" 



(17) 

Census — Boys 45, girls 40, total 85, total enrollment 77, 
average attendance 51. No. of families sending to school 
28. No. of families not sending to school 3. No. of illit- 
erates on census roll 0. No. of grades school 7. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to the county 
$154.50. Total cost 1160. Present value $250. 

The Board purchased an old church and converted it 
into a school building. An excellent school was taught 
here this year. Much credit is due the committee for the 
v^ork they have done in increasing the interest. 

Township 6, District 36. 

^ ^ .^ li/t4-^'^ ^i^a^^z^ M^i^ 

Elizabeth School, established 1904. ^^ ^ ^^ r .^i 

Teachers -Mr. J. B. Philbeck, Miss Bessie Mauney, f", \ 
salaries per month $40 and $25. $11 of principal's salary ^ '^ 
raised by private subscription. v.\^ 

Census— Boys 64; girls 96; total 156; total enrollment 
118; average attendance 76; No. of families sending to 
school 38; No. of families not sending to school 8; No. of 
illiterates on census roll 0; No. of grades in school 7. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to county 
$651. Total cost $750. Present value $800. 

No. of volumes in library 84. Pupils using library 61. 
Times books were taken out 276. Cost of library $30. 

Township 6, District 37. 

t^* nSr^ «3^ 

Poplar Springs School, established 1903. 

Teachers— Mr. J. B. Smith and Miss Maggie Cline, 
salaries per month $35 and $25. Six dollars of principal's 
salary raised by private subscription. 

Census— Boys — , girls — , total — , total enrollment 
76, average attendance 56. Families sending to school 24. 



(18) 

Families not sending to school 1. Illiterates on census roll 
7. Grades in school 7. 

Cost to the county of house furniture and grounds 
$320.28. Total cost $500. Present value $550. 

Value of library $40; books in library 109; books donat- 
ed during session 25; No. using library during session 59. 

House is built in accordance with State's plans and is 
well equipped. 

Township 6, District 38. 

^r^ 9^^ %^^ 

Mt. Zion School, rebuilt 1906. 

Teacher— Mr. S. S. Mauney, salary per month $29. 

Census— Boys 24, girls 32, total 56, total enrollment 
48, average attendance 34. No. of families sending to 
school 16. No. of families not sending to school 1. Illit- 
erates on census roll 0. Grades in school 7. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to county $180. 
Total cost $300. Present value $325. 

This is a sparcely populated district but the interest 
is good. A new house was built this year but still lacks 
desks and more blackboard space. 

Township 6, District 39. 

Jf* Jf' tSr' 

Zoar School, established 1903. 

Teachers— Mr. V. A. Gardner and Miss Mabel Jetton, 
salaries per month $29 and $25. 

Census— Boys 83; girls 91; total 174; total enrollment 
84; average attendance 51; No. of families sending to 
school 28; No. of families not sending to school 12; No. of 
illiterates on census roll 17; No. of grades in school 7. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to the county 
$400; total cost $400; present value $200. 



N 



*^^ 




(19) 

The Board purchased an old church and converted it 
into a school building. It is rather poorly equipped. A 
part of this district is composed of the Lilly Cotton Mill. 

Township 7, District 40. 

%^^ <^^ ^^ 

Beaver Dam School, established 1904. 

Teachers— Miss Maggie Glasco and Mrs. Ada Brown, 
salaries per month $29 and $20. 

Census— Boys 71; girls 54; total 125; total enrollment 
85; average attendance 701. No. of families sending to 
school 38; No. of families not sending to school 5. No. of 
illiterates on census roll 0. No. of grades in school 7. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to the county 
$559.88. Total cost $600. Present value $650. 

No. of volumes in library 85. Value of library 135. No. 
of times books were taken out by pupils 118. Library es- 
tablished late in the session. 

An election for special tax resulted in a vote of 33 for 
and 31 against special tax. 

Township 7, District 41. 

9i£r^ %2^ ^^ 

Double Springs School, established 1904. 

Teachers— Mr. J. L. Greene and Miss Edith Dixon, 
salaries per month $29 and $25. 

Census— Boys 55; girls 48; total 103; total enrollment 
93; average attendance 65; No. of families sending to 
school 37; No. of families not sending to school 2; No. of 
illiterates on census roll 0; No. of grades in school -. 

Cost to the county of house furniture and grounds 
^350. Total cost $875. Present value $875. 

Librarian failed to make a report. 

House is one of the very best in the county, is well 
equipped with maple desks. Needs more blackboard space 
for the primary department. 



(20) 

Township 7, District 42. 

Jt* Jf* flf' 

Cabaniss School, established 1900. 

Teacher— Mr. M. L. White, salary per month $29. 

Census— Boys 24, girls 26; total 50, total enrollment 
50, average attendance 37. No. of families sending to 
school 22. No. of families not sending to school 0. No. 
of illiterates on census roll 0. No. of grades in school 6. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to the county 
$35.00. Total cost $225. Present value $325. 

An exhibition was held at the close of the school at 
which there were over 750 people in attendance. 

Township 7, District 43. 

Jr* JF* t^ J ■ 

Wright School, established 1904. 

Teachers— Miss Carrie Beam and Miss Fannie Jones, 
salaries per month $27 each. 

Census— Boys 67; girls 55; total 122; total enrollment 
85; average attendance 49. No. of families sending to 
school 10. No. of families not sending to school 2. No. 
of illiterates on census roll 0. No. of grades in school 8. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to county 
$362. Total cost $375. "Present value $400. 

The house is practically without seats. The commit- 
tee, however, are making an effort to seat the house for 
the next session, expecting to use the best maple desks. 
Notwithstanding the poor equipment an excellent school 
was taught here this year. 

Township 7, District 44. 

t^^ t^^ %^^ 

Mooresboro School, established 1904. 

Teachers— Misses Daisy Lovelace, Lillah Bridges and 




Mooresboro, District 44, 




Beam's Mill, District 56. 



(21) 

Willda Scoggins, salaries per month $29, $25 and $25. 

Census— Boys 84, girls 77, total 161, total enrollment 
148, average attendance 109. No. of families sending to 
school 46. No. of families not sending to school 6. Illit- 
erates on census roll 0. Grades in school 7. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to county $500. 
Total cost $1300. Present value $1300. 

No. of volumes in library 106. No. of pupils enrolled 
during session 154. No. of times books were taken out by 
pupils 100. Funds have been raised for a supplementary 
library. 

Township 7, District 45. 

•3*' t2r' *!r' 

Lattimore's School, established 1903. 

Teachers— Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Chambers, salaries per 
month $27 each. 

Census— Boys 49; girls 51; total 100; total enrollment 
94; average attendance 83; No. of families sending to 
school 44; No. of families not sending to school 2; No. of 
illiterates on Census roll 0; No. of grades in school . 

Cost to the county of house furniture and grounds 
$425. Total cost $800. Present value $800, 

An election for special tax resulted in a vote of 44 to 
4 in favor of special tax. The prospects are very bright 
for establishing a good high school here. The library was 
gotten too late for a report from it this year. 

Township 7, District 46. 

t^^ ^^* ^z^ 

Rehobeth School, established 1904. 

Teacher— Mr. J. D. Eskridge, salary per month $29. 

Census— Boys 33; girls 45; total 78; total enrollment 
76; average attendance 41; No. of families sending to 
school 26; No. of families not sending to school 1; No. of 
illiterates on census roll 8; No. of grades in school 7. 



(22) 

Cost to the county of house furniture and grounds 
$20. Total cost 1200. Present vaUie i^200. 

The school building is an old church which was donat- 
ed to the school board by the stewards. On the whole it 
does not present a very attractive appearance. 

Township 7, District 47. 

<^^ 4^^ tj^^ 

Pleasant Ridge School. 

Teacher— Mr. J. U. Rollins, salary per month $29. 

Census— Boys 29; girls 30; total 59; total enrollment 
49; average attendance 35. No. of families sending to 
school 23; No. of families not sending to school 5. No. of 
illiterates on census roll 4. No. of grades in school 6. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds $75. 

House is too small and is very poorly equipped. Inter- 
est seems to be on the increase. 

Township 8, District 48. 

•3* «3^ «^ 

Henry Warlick School, established 1904. 

Teachers— Mr. Oscar Fortenberry and Miss Creola 
Peeler, salaries per month $29 and $25. 

Census— Boys 61; girls 49; total 110; total enrollment 
72; average attendance 44. Families sending to school 37. 
Families not sending to school 14. Illiterates on census roll 
3. Grades in school 7. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to the county 
$387; total cost $425; present value $500. 

The above shows the statistics for only two months as 
the term could not be finished for the want of a teacher. 



_ (23) 

Township 8, District 49. 

' ^3% ^P^ t^* 

Willis, W. S. Lattimore School. 

Teachers— Miss Josie Spake and Mr. Carlo Swafford, 
salaries per month $29 and $25. 

Census— Boys 54, girls 59, total 113, total enrollment 
65. average attendance 38. Families sending to school 17. 
Families not sending to school 5. Illiterates on census roll 
0. Grades in school 7. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds $200. 

This district contains two schools. One of them has 
been run as a branch school of the other. The two to- 
gether with No. 53 might be consolidated, transferring the 
border pupils to the adjoining districts. 

Township 8, District 60. 

%P^ fc^* fc?* 

Powell School. 

Teachers— Mr. 0. J. Lattimore and Miss Nora Elliott, 
salaries per month $29 and $20. 

Census— Boys 70, girls 50, totall20, total enrollment 
109, average attendance 46. Families sending to school 
36. Families not sending to school 9. Illiterates on census 
roll 1. Grades in school 7. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds $250. 

Librarian failed to make a report. The books are old 
and have not been read extensively this term. 

Township 8, District 51. 

^v %^* %^^ 

Elliott School, established 1904. 

Teachers— Miss Daisy Hunt and Miss Luna Lattimore, 
salaries per month $29 and $10. 

Census— Boys 43, girls 54, total 97, total enrollment 
65, average attendance 45. Families sending to school 23. 



(2 4) ^ ^ 

Families not sending to school 4. Illiterates on census roll 
4. Grades in school 8. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to county $0, 
total cost $250, present value $300. 

Township 8, District 52. 

«^ tSr' ^y* 

Union School, established 1903. 

Teachers— Mrs. J. D. Eskridge and Miss Ella Dixon, 
salaries per month 129 and 125. 

Census— Boys 86, girls 67, total 153, total enrollment 
123, average attendance 72. Families sending to school 
38. Families not sending to school 14. Illiterates on census 
roll 0. Grades in school 7. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to the county 
$275, total cost ^550, present value $750. 

An excellent school has been taught here for the past 
few years and the interest seems to be very good this year. 
Sentiment is developing in favor of special tax. 

Township 8, District 53. 

^f* nS^ <^^ 

Hopkin Hill School. 

Teacher — Miss Jennie Lattimore, salary per month $29. 

Census— Boys 32, girls 32, total 64, total enrollment 
48, average attendance 23. Families sending to school 21. 
Far v:iies not sending to school 3. Illiterates on census 
ro!! '\ Grades in school 7. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds $100. 

Township 8, District 54. 

J* J* ^^ 

New House School. 

Teachers— Miss Cora Scruggs and Miss Bettie Rollins, 
salaries per month $29 and $20. 



_(25) 

Census— Boys 46; girls 46; total 92; total enrollment 
74; average attendance 43. No. of families sending to 
school 34. No. of families not sending to school 7. No. 
of illiterates on census roll 0. No. of grades in school 7. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds $250. 

This is a joint school with Rutherford county. The 
house has only one room and the attendance does not 
justify more than one teacher. 

Township 8, District 65. 

«^* ^2^ ^^ 

Palm Tree School. 

Teacher— Mr. J. G. Lattimore, salary per month 129. 

Census— Boys 35, girls 38; total 73, total enrollment 
45, average attendance 22. No. of families sending to 
school 14. No. of families not sending to school 3. No. 
of illiterates on census roll 0. No. of grades in school 6. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to the county 
$25.00. Present value $100. 

The house is an old church house. The attendance is 
very small as compared with what it should be. 

Township 9, District 56. 

^^ *^ *^ 

Beam's Mill School, established 1901. 

Teachers— Misses Florence Wilson and Essie Elliott, 
salaries per month $29 and $20. 

Census— Boys 45; girls 37; total 82; total enrollment 
89; average attendance 66; No. of families sending to 
school 30; No. of families not sending to school 1; No. of 
illiterates on census roll 0; No, of grades in school 7. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to county 
$75. Total cost $350. Present value $600. 

No. of volumes in library 85. Pupils using library 68. 
Times books were taken out 363. Cost of library $35. 



_ (26) 

General interest here is very good, due largely to the 
work of the committee and tireless efforts of the teachers. 

Township 9, District 57, 

Belwood School. 

Teachers—Mrs. Sallie E. Jones, Mr. L. M. Wilson and 
Miss Loula B. Wilson, salaries per month $29, $25 and $20. 

Census— Boys 100, girls 85, total 185, total enrollment 
157, average attendance 100. Families sending to school 
55. Families not sending to school 4. Illiterates on census 
roll 5. Grades in school 8. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to the county 
$250. Total cost $2,000. Present value $2,500. 

No. of books in library 108. Pupils in school using 
library 157. Times books were taken out 183. Cost of 
library $75. 

llJowAship 9, District 58. 

vxp " Piedmont High School, 
y^^^ Teachers -Prof. W. D. Burns, Principal; Mr. P. L. 
Newton, Miss Kate Shellam and Miss Dora Falls. 

Census— Boys 141, girls 132, total 273, total enrollment 
140, average attendance 104. No. of families sending to 
school 74. No. of families not sending to school 22. No. of 
illiterates on census roll 17. No. of grades in school 10. 

This property belongs to private stock holders. It is 
easily the foremost high school in the county and will take 
rank among the leading high schools in the State. The 
building will be enlarged by a $2,000 addition, which will 
be completed by July 15th. 

Township 9, District 59. 

t^^ ^^^ 4^^ 

Royster School, established 1904. 



K 



(27) 

Teachers— Miss Edna Dixon and Miss Eugenia Elliott, 
salaries per month $29 and $15. 

Census- Boys 40; girls 33; total 73; total enrollment 
53; average attendance 44. Families sending to school 17. 
Families not sending to school 8. Illiterates on census roll 
0. Grades in school 7. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to the county 
1345.35; total cost $525; present value $600. 

Township 9, District 60, 

^r^ ^2^ ^^ 

Double Shoal School, established 1903. 

Teachers— Mr. C. F. Gold and Miss S. Lou Greene, 
salaries per month $29 and $22. 

Census— Boys 57, girls 55, total 112, total enrollment 
92, average attendance 73. Families sending to school 44. 
Families not sending to school 6. Illiterates on census roll 
0. Grades in school 10. 

Cost to the county of house furniture and grounds 
i:^3r30. Total cost $425. Present value $450. 

Township 9, District 61. 

^r^ ^^ t^^ 

Fallston School, established 1904. 

Teachers— Miss Mary Wright, Miss L. Beam and Mr. 
C. M. Ledford, salaries per month $27. 

Census— Boys 65; girls 54; total 119; total enrollment 
95; average attendance 69. No. of families sending to 
school 38; No. of families not sending to school 0. No. of 
illiterates on census roll 0. No. of grades in school 8. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to the county 
$511. Total cost $511. Present value $600. 

This district has a branch school taught this year by 
C. M. Ledford. It ought to be discontinued after this 
year as all the patrons are within easy reach of the Fall- 
ston school. 



(28) 

Township 9, District 62. 

tS^ «3* tS^ 

Richard School, estabhshed 1903. 

Teacher— Mr. Robert L. Hunt, salary per month $29. 

Census — Boys 40, girls 48, total 88, total enrollment 

64, average attendance 38. Families sending to school 24. 
Families not sending to school 3. Illiterates on census roll 
0. Grades in school 8. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to the county 
$130, total cost $260, present value $300. 

Township 9, District 63. 

t^* «^^ *d5^ 

Hayes School. 

Teacher— Miss Sallie Allen, salary per month $28. 

Census— Boys 25, girls 60, total 85, total enrollment 
25, average attendance 42. Families sending to school 
20. Families not sending to school 2. Illiterates on census 
roll 3. Grades in school 8. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds $100. 

This is a joint school with Lincoln county. 

Township 10, District 64. 

t3^ J^ Jf' 

St. Peter School, established 1904. 

Teachers— Misses Joyce Carpenter and Minnie Boggs, 
salaries per month $25 each. 

Census— Boys 59, girls 49, total 108, total enrollment 
88, average attendance 65. No. of families sending to 
school 34. No. of families not sending to school 0. Illit- 
erates on census roll 5. .^Grades in school 8. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to county $291.-' 

65. Total cost $541.65 Present value $600. 

The interest in the district has always been very good. 
A splendid school was taught here this year. 




Fallston School, District 61, 




St. Peter's School, District 64. 



(29) ^^^^ 

Township 10, District 65. 

e^* *^^ ^f^ 

Ledford School, established 1904. 

Teachers— Rev. A. P. Bumgardner and Miss Bessie 
Ledford, salaries per month $29 and $15. 

Census— Boys 47; girls 42; total 89; total enrollment 
70; average attendance 40; No. of families sending to 
school 20; No. of families not sending to school 12; No. of 
illiterates on census roll 0; No. of grades in school 7. 

Cost to the county of house furniture and grounds 
$380. Total cost $380. Present value $425. 

Township 10, District 66. 

t^* t^^ e^^ 

Hoyle School, established 1904. 

Teachers— Mr. Doner Mull and Mr. Bergin Willis, 
salaries per month $25 and $20. 

Census— Boys 50, girls 55, total 105, total enrollment 
76, average attendance 47. Families sending to school 26. 
Families not sending to school 8. Illiterates on census 
roll 0. Grades in school 6. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to the county 
$51.50, total cost ^350, present value $400. 

Township 10, District 67. 

t^ t^* ^* 

A. D. Warlick School, established 1904. 

Teachers— Miss Mary Lutz, Mr. H. T. Willis, salaries 
per month $29 and $10. 

Census— Boys 60; girls 58; total 116; total enrollment 
78; average attendance 39; No. of families sending to 
school 42; No. of families not sending to school 2; No. of 
illiterates on census roll 4; No. of grades in school 6. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to the county 
$269.90. Total cost $400. Present value $450. 



(30) 

Township 11, District 68. 

Logan School, established 1904. 

Teachers— Messrs. A. C. Brackett and P. M. Whis- 
nant, salaries per month $29 and $25. 

Census— Boys 62; girls 58; total 120; total enrollment 
68; average attendance 52. No. of families sending to 
school 17; No. of families not sending to school 15. No, of 
illiterates on census roll 0. No. of grades in school 6. 

Cost of building furniture and grounds to the county 
$500. 50. Total cost $520. 50. Present value $525. 

Township 11, District 69. 

t^^ *^^ ^^ 

McNeilly School. 

Teachers— Misses Christina Brackett, Essie Crotts, 
salaries per month $27. 

Census— Boys 31, girls 21, total 52, total enrollment 
39, average attendance 23. Families sending to school 14. 
Families not sending to school 7. Illiterates on census roll 
3. Grades in school 6. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds $150. 

This district has two schools, one being a branch of 
the other. It is located in the mountainous section of the 
county and the interest is not good. 

Township 11, District 70. 

^r' t^* t^* 

Casar School. 

Teachers— Messrs. J. H. Brackett, A. B. Peeler and 
A. C. Wortman, salaries per month $29, $25 and $15. 

Census— Boys 82; girls 89; total 171; total enrollment 
151; average attendance 86. Families sending to school 48. 



fL^i^t#:^Mfe- W 



Families not sending to school 10.! Illiterates on census roll 
0, Grades in school 8. 

Cost of building furniture arid grounds to the county 
%m)\ total cost $600; present value $650. 

This is the first rural district in the county to vote a 
special tax. The amount however is too small to supi)ort 
a good high school, the levy being only 15 cents. 

Township 11, District 71, 

^ ^ J* 

Point School. 

Teacher— Mr. W. G. Devinney, salary per month $26. 

Census— Boys 23, girls 21, total 44, total enrollment 
44, average attendance 20. Families sending to school 
15. Families not sending to school 2. Illiterates on census 
roll 19. Grades in school 6. 

Present value of house furniture and grounds $75. 

This is a joint school with Rutherford county. The 
house is very small and poorly equipped. Cleveland 
county would not need this district but for a few families 
who live in the extreme part of the county. 

Summary--White Schools. 

t^* ^* ^* 

No. of schools 71. Total number of teachers 136. 
Census-boys 3,884; girls 3,764; total 7,648; total enroll- 
ment 6,531; average daily attendance 3,730; average sala- 
ry paid teachers per month $25.30. (From county) No. of 
children between 12 and 21 who can not read and write 
161. Total number of children on census blanks not at 
tending school 1,117. No. of families sending to school 
1,901. No. of families not sending to school 462. Value 
of school buildings and grounds, including furniture, $60,- 
000. Cost of school buildings and grounds to county for 
past five years $12,749. No. of libraries in the county 



(32) 

19. No. established this year 7. No. of supplementary 
libraries established this year 3. No. of volumes in the 
libraries 1,647. No. volumes taken out by the children 
1,719. 



L'iisM^t^ ' Colored Schools 



Rock Cut School, District 1-P. C. Young teacher, 
census 63, enrollment 17, attendance 11, salary of teacher 

$18. 

Boiling Springs School, District 2— Census 125, enroll- 
ment 80, attendance 40, salary of teachers $37, C. F. Gin- 
gles and Jennie Hamilton. 

Shoal Creek School, District 3— Census 92, enrollment 
78, attendance 55, salary of teacher $22, Ida L. Roberts. 

Patterson Springs School, District 4^Census 101, en- 
rollment 72, attendance 47, salary of teacher $20, Albert 
Hord. 

Vestibule School, District 5 — Census 142, enrollment 
131, attendance 54, salary of teachers $37, Dathula Rob- 
erts and Noler Ellis. 

Compact School, District 6^Census 102, enrollment 
94, average attendance 79, salary of teacher $20, Rev. R. 
H. Simmons teacher. 

Long Branch School, District 7— Census 81, enroll-| 
ment 55, attendance 37, salary of teacher $20, C. F. Rob- 
erts teacher. 

King's Mountain Graded School, District 8 — Census 
100, enrollment 65, attendance 40, salary of teacher $22, 
J. L. Leeper. 

Washington School, District 9— Census 183, enrollment 
JA/ 97, attendance 40, salary of teachers $37, David Gates and 
^J Georgia Gates. 



•^7 




Dougless Academy (Colored School,) District 19, 




Clarkson Institute (Colored.) 



(35) 

Financial Statement. 

^9% ^% V?* 

Total school fund from all sources $22,102.21 

Paid for white teachers 12,744.07 

Paid for colored teachers 1,791.45 

County Superintendent's salary or commission... 833.02 

County Superintendent's expense 39. 80 

Sites for whites 50.00 

Building for whites G35.82 

Repairs for whites 160.70 

Repairs for colored 58.42 

Mileage and per diem of Board of Education 77.25 

Printing and advertising 23.55 

Wood for whites 457.93 

Wood for colored 103.90 

Supplies for whites 323.77 

Census whites 77.75 

Census colored 19.95 

Supplies colored 27.68 

Boooks and stationery 54.35 

Office rent for Superintendent 40.00 

Certificate to State Report (Tiddy ) 2.00 

Certificate to State Report E. S. Campbell 1.00 

B. R. Lacy installment on loan 612.01 

W. H. Eskridge, recording deeds 19.50 

First National Bank note.. 3,500.00 

Treasurer's commission 428.56 

Total disbursements $22,107.08 




(36) 

Teacher's Institutes. 

.^ Ji' J^ 

In order to have p^ood schools we must have good 
teachers to teach them. And there is no way by which a 
teacher can be fitted for the work as well as by attending 
teacher's meetings and summer schools. The short terms 
of the schools and low salaries the teachers receive will 
not enable them to attend a normal training school. So 
the majority of our teachers must be content to attend an 
institute held somewhere in the county within easy reach 
of them and where the expenses will be reduced to a min- 
imum. 

Realizing these conditions we held an institute of four 
weeks duration. In order to get good accommodations in 
both board and school room equipment Piedmont High 
School was selected as the place. 114 teachers were in 
attendance and the interest increased from day to day. 
Class room work was done with the teachers as pupils and 
methods taught incidentally. Special emphasis was placed 
upon primary work. All the teachers were drilled in the 
use of sounds and the phonetic methods. It is very grati- 
fying to note the progress some of the teachers have made 
with this method and their work is sufficient to establish 
its superiority over the old method of teaching beginners. 
Short talks were made on how to increase attendance and 
enlist the patrons in the interest of the school and how to 
care for the health of the children in the school room. On 
the whole much good was done during this school and we 
are convinced that it is a better policy to hold longer terms 
than to hold short institutes oftener. Examinations were 
held at the close of the school and certificates issued to 82 
teachers: First grade, males 9, females 10. Second grade, 
males 8, females 10. Another examination was held in 
October and certificates issued as follows: First grade, 
males 15, females 22. Second grade, males 2, females 10. 
Third grade, males 4, females 6. 



(35) , 

Financial Statement. 

v^* ^* %^ 

Total school fund from all sources $22,102.21 

Paid for white teachers 12,744.67 

Paid for colored teachers 1,791.45 

County Superintendent's salary or commission... 833.02 

County Superintendent ' s expense 39. 80 

Sites for whites 50.00 

Building for whites 635.82 

Repairs for whites 160.70 

Repairs for colored 58.42 

Mileage and per diem of Board of Education 77.25 

Printing and advertising 23.55 

Wood for whites 457.93 

Wood for colored 103.90 

Supplies for whites 323.77 

Census whites 77.75 

Census colored 19.95 

Supplies colored 27. 68 

Boooks and stationery 54.35 

Office rent for Superintendent 40.00 

Certificate to State Report (Tiddy ) 2.00 

Certificate to State Report E.S.Campbell 1.00 

B. R. Lacy installment on loan 612.01 

W. H. Eskridge, recording deeds 19.50 

First National Bank note 3.500.00 

Treasurer's commission 428. 56 

Total disbursements $22,107.08 




(36) 

Teacher's Institutes. 

In order to have good schools we must have good 
teachers to teach them. And there is no way by which a 
teacher can be fitted for the work as well as by attending 
teacher's meetings and summer schools. The short terms 
of the schools and low salaries the teachers receive will 
not enable them to attend a normal training school. So 
the majority of our teachers must be content to attend an 
institute held somewhere in the county within easy reach 
of them and where the expenses will be reduced to a min- 
imum. 

Realizing these conditions we held an institute of four 
weeks duration. In order to get good accommodations in 
both board and school room equipment Piedmont High 
School was selected as the place. 114 teachers were in 
attendance and the interest increased from day to day. 
Class room work was done with the teachers as pupils and 
methods taught incidentally. Special emphasis was placed 
upon primary work. All the teachers were drilled in the 
use of sounds and the phonetic methods. It is very grati- 
fying to note the progress some of the teachers have made 
with this method and their work is sufficient to establish 
its superiority over the old method of teaching beginners. 
Short talks were made on how to increase attendance and 
enlist the patrons in the interest of the school and how to 
care for the health of the children in the school room. On 
the whole much good was done during this school and we 
are convinced that it is a better policy to hold longer terms 
than to hold short institutes oftener. Examinations were 
held at the close of the school and certificates issued to 32 
teachers: First grade, males 9, females 10. Second grade, 
males 3, females 10. Another examination was held in 
October and certificates issued as follows: First grade, 
males 15, females 22. Second grade, males 2, females 10. 
Third grade, males 4, females 6. 



m 

Ebenezar School, District 10 - Census 88 enrollment 64, 
attendance 32, salary of teacher $20, Inez Roberts. 

Eli Roberts School, District 11, David Miller teacher, 
census 62, enrollment 30, attendance 13, salary of teacher 
$20 

Shelby Graded School, District 12— Census 166, en- 
rollment 136, attendance 90, salary of teachers $40, Rev. 
R. Shipp and Mary 0. Roberts. 

Poplar Springs School, District 13— Census 42, enroll- 
ment 23, attendance 11, salary of teacher $15, Fleming C. 
^Williamson. 

Eskridge Grove School, District 14— Census 109, en- 
rollment 68, attendance 36, salary of teacher $20, Rev. J. 
W. Roberts teacher. 

Mooresboro School, District 15— Census 55, enrollment 
47, attendance 30, salary of teacher $20, Florence Wells 
teacher. 

Brooks Chapel, District 16— Census 74, enrollment 50, 
attendance 32, salary of teacher $20, Isabel Wells teacher. 

Bostic Grove School, District 17— Census 28, enroll- 
ment 23, attendance 18, salary of teacher $18, Maudie 
Gidney teacher. 

Philadelphia School, District 18— Census 65, enroll- 
ment 47, attendance 32, salary of teacher $20, Cora Maun- 
ey teacher. 

Douglas School, District 19— Census 80, enrollment 73, 
attendance 45, salary of teachers $40, Florence Mills and 
l^ettie Smith teachers. 

Flat Rock School, District 20- Census 57, enrollment 
45, attendance 32, salary of teacher $20, Ed S. Beam 
teacher. 

Big Hill School, District 21 Mamie Beam teacher. 



(34) 

census 35, enrollment 29, attendance 26, salary of teacher 
$18. 

Hunt School, District 22— Census 42, enrollment 16, 
attendance 6, salary of teacher S20, J. W. Shuford teacher. 

Summary— Colored Schools. 

«<9*' ^y* Jr* 

Number of schools 22; total number of teachers 27; 
census 1,892; enrollment 1,350; average attendance 806; 
average salary paid to colored teachers $19.40. 




(37) 

No summer school was held last summer for the col- 
ored teachers, but one will be held during the following 
summer. The examinations were lield for the colored 
teachers in August and October and certificates given as 
follows: First grade, males 5, females 4. Second grade, 
males 16, females 20. The grade of scholarship among 
the colored teachers as a general rule is rather low, but 
the race as a whole is enthusiastic over education. 

Teacher's Clubs. 

A County Teacher's Association was organized in No- 
vember with Geo. P. Webb President and M. L. White 
Secretary. All the teachers are required to attend the 
meetings of this association. Owing to the unfavorable 
weather only two successful meetings were held during 
the school term. The last meeting was a decided success. 
A program was arranged consisting of discussions of vari- 
ous topics assigned certain teachers and of classes taught 
by some of the teachers from the Shelby Graded School 
for the benefit of the association. 

In addition to the teacher's Association teacher's clubs 
were organized comprising two adjoining townships. This 
gives from fourteen to twenty teachers to each club. These 
clubs have the same officers as the Association and they 
confer with the County Superintendent in regard to the 
time of meeting so that he can arrange to be present at 
each meeting. Some of the clubs met three times while 
the schools were in session. Experience shows that a more 
successful meeting can be had by taking one of the school 
days for the meeting as a better attendance can be secur- 
ed. Programs are sent to all the teachers assigning a 
subject to each. - 

No teacher's clubs for the colored teachers have been 
organized owing to the fact that they are scattered over 
the county at considerable distances apart and it is difficult 
to get them together. 



__^ (38) 

Communication with Committees and 
Teachers. 

When it was necessary to communicate with commit- 
teemen and teachers in a general way we have used the 
columns of our county papers which have been generously 
extended to us. We are very grateful to the editors for 
the interest they have taken with us and the service they 
have rendered the cause of education. 

Quite a number of circular posters and printed pro- 
grams have been sent out from time to time announcing 
public gatherings, etc. A copy of the Committemen's 
Record has been placed in the hands of each committee. 
They have been used to some advantage by some of the 
committees and have aided them in electing the teachers 
according to law. 

Generally speaking our committees are composed of 
conscientious men who are interested in education and try 
to do their duty as sworn guardians of the little children. 
Some of them have rendered valuable service by frequent 
visits to the school and by urging their neighbors to send 
the children to school. 

Gradation of Schools. 

With a few exceptions the schools have been carefully 
graded and the new register accurately kept. The County 
Superintendent visited the schools for the purpose of 
assisting in grading the schools when requested to do so. 
Grading of the pupils has encouraged them by showing 
them where they properly belong. In order to assist the 
teacher in grading the school a graded course of study 
was prepared by the Superintendent and placed in the 
hands of each teacher. In addition to a specific statement 
as to what should compose each grade the pamphlet con- 
tains a few suggestions on method and discipline. 

Census. 

1'he census for the most ]y<u'{ is by no means accurate. 



(39) 

Nor is this in every case the fault of the census taker. 
The per cent of illiteracy for the white children is - per 
cent. While we believe this can and will be reduced we 
believe that a carefully taken census would show a higher 
per cent, of illiteracy. The trouble seems to be in that 
the bounds of the districts are not well defined. 

The Board of Education needs a map of the county 
laid off with reference to the public roads with the school 
district as a unit. Such a map would cost more than the 
available funds just now would justify but it would be 
economy to provide one. A large portion of the county 
needs re-districting and the bounds of the district well 
defined. A reasonable amount of consolidation with a 
few districts would greatly increase school facilities. 
Special Tax. 

The sentiment in favor of special tax for longer terms 
and better paid teachers is growing gradually. ' Some edu- 
cational campaigning has been done the result of which 
has been elections held in six places, three of which car- 
ried while three were lost. In one of these which lost the 
vote was a tie and in the other more votes were cast for 
special tax than against it, which goes to show the attitude 
of the people toward special tax. 

Some of the most progressive districts have paid their 
teachers supplemented salaries raised by private subscrip- 
tion and it is only a matter of time when practically all 
the districts will vote this special tax. 
School Houses. 

Cleveland county has some buildings that will favor- 
ably compare with those of any county of the State so 
far as our information goes. Cuts of some of the best 
buildings appear in this report, but they do not represent 
all of the best buildings. Three new buildings have been 
built this year in accordance with the State's approved 
plans. One of them, that of Earl is a model of its kind, 
being one of the handsomest in the county. 



(40) 

Experience has taught us that it pays to equip a school 
room with best possible conveniences for comfort to teacher 
and children. The child ought to have a good comfortable 
desk with plenty of room which will aid materially in solv- 
ing the problem of discipline. The teacher ought to have 
a good wall map, plenty of blackboard space and a good 
teacher's table. These things are indispensible to the 
teacher and can be had with little cost by every district. 

This year four school houses have been equipped with 
the best grade of maple desks, and one with the best qual- 
ity of silica blackboard. These desks although a little 
higher in price, are cheaper and better in the end than the 
so called home-made desks. 

Attendance. 

The increased average attendance this year over pre- 
vious years is more than gratifying. This is due in part 
to the favorable condition of the weather, but a greater 
portion of it is due to the increased interest on the part of 
the patrons and the tireless efforts of the teachers in get- 
ting the children in school and keeping them there. In 
some instances the enrollment is higher than the census. 
This is due to the fact that some of the patrons are ten- 
ants and have moved to the district after the census was 
taken. In other cases patrons living near the line sent 
into the adjoining district. 

Reports. 

In addition to the regular monthly and final reports 
the teachers were required to make a weekly report to the 
County Superintendent. These have been a source of in- 
formation to the Superintendent, and he could not keep 
well in touch with the work in the several districts without 
them. We suggest that the same form be printed on a 
postal card instead of a sheet of paper as this will secure 
a more promi)t report and be more satisfactory. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. T. Falls, Co. Supt. 



Invite Your Friends 
Here With You U 

One of the things that we have always 
been very grateful for is that our patrons 
have been more than kind in speaking about 
our drug store to their friends, and in invit- 
ing them to come here and trade. Of course 
this is what we wish, and we try to conduct 
our drug business in such a way that it will 
appeal to all of our customers so strongly 
that they will take it upon themselves to in- 
vite their friends and urge them to come 
here and do all of their drug store trading 
with us, and thus obtain the very best 
drugs, chemicals, etc., that the markets of 
the world afford. Certainly, any word that 
you can speak for us will be most sincerely 
appreciated, and we take this opportunity of 
thanking you in advance for whatever you 
may say in our behalf. R. F. D. mail and 
phone orders receive special attention. 

The One Quality Drug Store. 

The One Price Drug Store. 
Respectfully, 

H. E. Kendall, 

Wholesale and Retail Druggist, 

Phone No. 2. Shelby, N. C. 



e 

^ 
e 

& 



'5AY ! 



ft 



Says the little boy, ''this is great, 
this Peach Mellow," a fine 
smooth, cool drink, that tastes 
exactly like Peach. Drink it once, 
and you can't stop. Order a sam- 
ple case of Shelby Carbonating 
and Bottling Works. 

I X r^ |i| r%Wlr\rt ^^^^^^^^^^ with your business, then 
'■ l^rilllxllllj quit your business until you have 
quenched your thirst by drinking some of the 
Shelby Carbonating and Bottling Works' 
high grade beverages. They are universally 
acknowledged to be the best on the market, 
which is proven by the increased demand 
from all parts of our territory. Other facto- 
ries are trying to imitate our goods, because 
they also recognize the quality. 



Drink 



Koca Nola, High Life, Ginger Ale, Beerhie, Birch 
Beer, Strawberry, Brandy Soda, Ginger Ale, 
Lemon Soda, Lemon Sour, Orange Phosphate, 
Cherry Phosphate, Chocolate, Rasport, Plain Soda, 
Blood Orange, Sarsaparilla, High Ola, Iron-Brew 
and Peach Mellow, a variety of choice flavors 
Sufficient to suit everybody's taste and are 
equal in body, richness and purity. 

Drink to your health and the health of your 
friends, that you may all live long and 
prosper. 

Yours very truly, 

Shelby Carbonating and Bottling Works, 

Shelby, N. C. 



9 



We Keep 

In stock Boilers, En- 
gines, Saw Mills, Inser- 
ted Tooth Circular 
Saws Saw points, Pul- 
leys, Shaftin(?s, Hang- 
ers, PipinR and Pipe 
Fittings. Globe and 
Check Valves. Injec- 
tors, Jet Pumps, Belt- 
ing, Belt Hooks, the 



STEAM 




'^■■I^ H ^ H ^ H ^> H ^ 11 ^ H ^ H ^ H ^ M ^ll i^ H ^ II i^ M ^ H ^W ^ n ^ M i^ H ^ H ^ I ff 

A, Blanton Grocery Co*, 

Wholesale Grocers, 

Marion and Shelby^ N, C. 



gj<4>oc:|>oc^oc*>o<:*>oc*>oc*>o<:*>oc*>o<:*>o«:^o<:^ 

f For Your Moneys' Worth 

In Clothing, Hats, Shoes, Hosiery, 
Shirts, Suspenders and Collars, as 
A well as the new fads in Gent's Fur- 
A nishings, visit 

I Evans E^ McBrayer's I 

I Clothing Store* ^ Shelby, N* C* I 



^«^-« 



HOUSES AND M ULES. 

FROi^RiE'ron aw 
LIVERY, FEEn ANT) SAEE Sl^ABEES. 

PTIONK NO. i20. SHirjI.HY, N^. C. 



Clyde Webb. 

The Cash Drug Store 




Has made a specialty of the Soda 
Fountain. With comfortable loung- 
es and chairs, with polite and cour- 
teous servants, and every modern 
equipment we are prepared to give 
every care to your wants. Call in 
and rest awhile and try a refreshing 
■ drink or be served with our deli- 
cious Cream , 

Everything in the way of Toilet Arti- 
cles, . Foreign and Domestic Per- 
fumes, Tobacco, Pipes and Fine 
Cigars can be had at our drug 
store. Our Drugs are Pure and 
Fresh. Prescriptions receive the 
personal attention of a licensed 
pharmacist 



CLYDE WEBB, Druggist, 



Phone 65. 



SHELBY, N. C. 



Parker-Gardner 
Company, 

Charlotte, North Carolina. 

Fine 
Furniture I 
Carpets 
And 
Rugs. 

Chickering and Ivers and 
Ponds Pianos. 



Write for Our Late Catalogues and Our 
Easy Payment Plans. 



PARKER-GARDNER CO., 

Charlotte, N. C. 



t — 



IIAR13^WARli 



Anything kept in a first-class hardware store 
can be found at BLANTON & WILKINS'S. 

Our tinshop is complete; can do any kind 
of Tin and Galvanized Iron Work 

PHONK 17. SKHJI^BY, N. C. 



-^ 



gjc:*>oc:*>oc:*>oc*>oc^oc*>oc*>oc*>oc^oc:t^oc$^oc::|>oc^oc*>oc^oc*>oc^o 

I J. L* Suttle Company, | 

4 Dealers in f 

I Dry Goods^ Clothings Shoes and Hats^ 4 

I Our Specialty: f 

- GENTS^ FURNISHINGS. I 

Phone 59* Shelby, RC | 



J. P* AUSTELL, The Barber. 

You are next ! For a nice 
clean shave, and your hair 
cut in the latest stvle. Have 
a massage ? It will help your 
face, and take a shampoo 
for an itching scalp 

I p. AUSTELL, Proprietor. T^: 



The ■ 

Security Life 



AND 



Annuity Company 

MutuaL Legal Reserve* 

Gauranty Capital $100,000.00 

Deposited with Insurance Commisioner of North Carolina. 



HOME OFFICE 

Greensboro, North Carolina. 



Made a Net Gain in Insurance ^ 

in North Carolina in 1905 of a 

■ S° 
K The largest net gain ever made in one ^o 

og, year in North Carolina by any other 'compa- <!^ 

ny was $1,195,579. <a> 

J. Van Lindley, Geo. A. Grimsley, «go 
President. - . Secretary. S 

A. \i. SCARBOROUGH, District Agent, g° 

Shelby, N. C. g 



9 
■a 

<5 



J)j:ai.kh in 

r'aints, Oils, Varnish, Stains, Furniture Paints, 
Kolling Paints for Iron or Tin, Window Glass, 
Terracotta Well Tubing. I will sell at short profits. 

K. M. 13KAM; 

SHKT>BY. N.C. 



Qeveland Mill 

And 

Power Company, 

Manufacturers and Merchants* 
STORES AT 

Lawndale, Cleveland iMills and Casar, 

Carry a well selected line of Stoves, 
Furniture, Farming Implements, 
Ladies' and Gent's Furnishings and 
infact everything generally needed 
to eat, wear or use 

QUALITY comes first in our selections. 
Satisfaction to every one in service and 
quality of goods, is our determined effort. 



W. E. McArthur, 

Photographer 

and dealer in 

Pictures, Frames, Etc. 

Disc Talking Machines and 

Records. 

Souvenier Postals. 

We are also making a specialty of copy 

ing and enlarging pictures. 
Call and see or write us. 

SHELBY, N. C. 



Weaver Organs and Pianos. 

These goods have been before the public 
over 35 years. For purity of tone, and 
durability, they are not excelled by 
any. I also sell the Estey and Buidette 
Organs, prices reasonable and 

On Easy Terms. 

See these goods before you buy. I also 
carry a line of musical goods, Guitars, 
Violins, Autoharps, Strings of all kinds. 
Also a nice lino of Stationery, School 
Supplies and Notions. Give me a call. 

s. I.. aii.i.F]si>iK 

Cor. Durham Hotel Building. Shelby, N.C. 




^ 



a 



Don't 
Educate 
Your Boy 

Along narrow lines and in theories only. 
Give him something practical. Teach him 
the value of economy and have him start a 
Bank Account with his Savings. This 
will teach him the valuable lesson of being 
Systematic. Thrift will follow. 

In 

The 

Meantime 

start a Bank Account yourself. Start it 
Now. Start and keep it with 

The First National Bank 
of Shelby. 



Capital $100,000.00. 

Total Resources, . . . $800,000.00. 



DIRECTORS. 



6 



CHAS. C. BLANTON, H. F. SCHENCK, 
J. D. LINEBERGER, A. C. MILLER, 



& 



B. BLANTON, X 
O. E. FORD. X, 



a GEORGE BLANTON. og> 



t^.^. 



•-^"t 




A Car Load of Pianos. 

We have just 
received a car 
load of 

Star, 
Richmond 
and 
Chase 
Pianos 

at Shelby. These Pianos are of the highest 
grade, having received the highest award 
at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. 
Louis 1904, Columbia Exposition Chicago 
1893, and have been endorsed by over one 
hundred Musical and Educational Institu- 
tions. 

Call and see us. We are located in the 
Shelby National Bank Building, at Shelby, 
and will be glad to have you call. 
A line can also be seen at Hickory, N. C. 

The Morrison Brothers 



Company^ 



Hickory, N. C. 



i 



Shelby. N. C. 



H?,c^>o^oc|>o^>o<:|>o4>oc:^>oc*>o4>oc^oc^oc:t>oc:^>oc:^>oc^oc^oc^>c:^^^ 




A 



Money Saved 

If you buy Watches, Clocks, Jew- 
elry, Silverware, Spectacles, Chi- A 
na, Glassware, etc., from us you Y 
have something left to buy something nJ' 
else. Look at the goods, get prices, -j 
then you will know how we tell the X 
truth A 

T. W. HAMRICK CO., 



Jewelers and Opticions. A 

Phone 81. SHELBY, N. C. I 



^o<^o<j3o<^o<^o<*3o<^o<*3o<*=.o<J:3o<»=.o^o^o<*=> <^od^ooi^ c|>oo^o^o^o<J=.o<*:> J3 



H» 



The Best Place to Buy 

Your Clothing, Shoes, Hats 
and Dress Goods is at 

McMurry-Hull Company ^s^ 

They will treat you right. Shelby, N. C. 



DON'T FORGET \ 

EbeltotVs (Books and (iroceries) 

FOR 

School Supplies, Books, 
|.o^ Stationery, Bibles, Etc. 

:" t^ Also Dealer in Fancy Groceries, nad Fine 
Confectioneries. 



^ 



Piedmont High School Faculty* 

WILLIAM D. BURNS, A,B., LL. B., 

(Wake Forest College.) 

History and Latin. 
P. LORENZO NEWTON, A. B., 

(Wake Forest College.) 

Mathematics, English and Political Science. 
Mrs. W. D. BURNS, A. B., 

(Catawba College and Peabody Conservatory of Music.) 

German. 
Miss DORA FALLS, A. B., 

(Catawba College and Baptist University for Women.) 

Intermediate Department. 
Miss KATHERINE G. SHELLEM, B. S., 

(Red Springs Seminary and Peace Institute.) 

Primary Department. 
Miss FANNIE RAMSAUR, M. S., 

(Southern Female College.) 

Stenography and Typewriting. 
Miss LULA F. TISDALE, 

(Peace Institue and Durham (Conservatory of Music.) 

Music and Elocution. 

Mrs. W. D. BURNS, A. B., 

Matron. 

Board last session averaged $4.96. Tuition $1 to $3. 

For catalog write to W. D. Burns, Lawndale, N. C. 



B. T. Falls, M. A. 
County Superintendent Public Schools, 

Shelby, N. C, May, 1, 1906. 
I take pleasure in bearing testimony regarding the 
Piedmont High School. I have spent some time in this 
o'chool and found the work of the class-rooms to be thorough, 
practical and far-reaching in its scope. The teachers are 
devoted to their work, and thoroughly competent, and they 
spare no effort in making the class-room a place of interest 
to the pupil. The school also has an excellent literary soci- 
ety. One of the strongest high school debates I ever listen- 
ed to was the one given by the members of the society. In 
n V opinion this school deserves a place among the best 
schools in this part of the State, and I readily commend it 
^c-i to all the people. RespectfrHy, 

J. T. Falls. 



^[ijfjfjfyr^^ 




^ Gantt Harness Co., | 

Manufacturers of rn 

Buggy and Wagon Harness^ Sad- ^ 
dies and Bridles of all kinds* ^ 

XV, All work (lone hy lirst-class workmen from l)est quality of H 
XX Home Tanned Leather. ri 

'B' Dealers in High-Grade Buggies and Car- {^^ 
'^ riages with both steel and rubber tires, also S 
°^ the famous J. I. Nissen round-hound, Gor- j^° 
XI mine wedged spoke wagon. H 

g Gantt Harness Co., Belwood, N.C. g 



That Fascinating Series of Readers 

GRADED CLASSICS 

Has been recently placed 
on the authorized list by 
the School Boards of 

New Yorkt Philadelphia and 
Washington 

l^^or circulars address 
B. F. JOHNSON PUBLISHING COMPANY 

ATLANTA RICHMOND DALLAS 



- ^ -y^ ^^d^ '^r}~i ^^cr^ '-b^-' ^cr-^ ^&-^ '-^&^ '-^d^^ ^(S~^ '-^&~' '-^y^ ^d-' ^-tt-* '-'d^ '-'o^-' '-'o^-' '-'d^ '-'o^ ^d^ "-^o ■ ^ 

Carolinas | 
§: Mona2;ite Compy t 

SHELBY, N. C. I ULDEBRAN, N. C. GAFFNEY, S. C. °^ 



ti^ ^^^ 



Miners and Purchasers 

Of all grades 

Monazite Sands. 



^ ^ 



Will negotiate for the purchase or 
lease of Good Monazite bearing 
property 



5^^ 9^^ 



W- samp: .ES of Sand tested for miners ^^^d 5^ 
^ quotations made as to value and r.c. • ^^